Don't worry ... we're not suggesting that you trade in your degree in science for getting up before dawn, an electronic float, and Benny Hill style door-step encounters! The Milkround is in fact a graduate recruitment fair which each year tours U.K. universities. This Web site aims to bring the job opportunities and company information of the fairs to your desktop.

Milkround is a well-planned site which offers easy access to three main sections. New users can come in through a special opening page that simplifies the process even further. Over 350 companies have registered with the site; the first section, "Employer Profiles," provides an overview of these companies. They are indexed into sectors such as sales and marketing, management consulting, and pharmaceuticals.

The amount of information available on a particular company seems to be limited by what they have provided. Some profiles are simply made up of a one-paragraph description and the contact details of the person who fields applications. Other companies have provided more in-depth information about themselves and the application procedures. In all cases it's worth treating these profiles with a pinch of salt -- they are, after all, written by companies looking to promote themselves. Details of how to apply for jobs is nonetheless essential.

The "Sector Profiles" section contains broad overviews of the type of jobs available in a list of 26 categories. The Milkround has teamed up with professional guilds of information technology, management consulting, and investment banking to provide particularly thorough guides for these three business sectors.

The information provided for other sectors is basic but does give you a good overview of the opportunities available. One major problem here is the lack of links to other information sources. The profile on law, for example, fails to link to the pages of the Law Society ( www.lawsociety.org.uk in case you are interested) and the pharmaceutical profile only links to the Association for the British Pharmaceutical Industry. An opportunity to provide a definitive information resource on the Milkround site is therefore missed.

Milkround also supplies a solid career advice section, which deals with the nuts and bolts of CV and cover letter preparation, dealing with interviews, and, most interestingly, a survival guide to assessment centres. There is also a CV bank that you can deposit your details in and hope that an employer comes calling. I personally have placed my CV on around half a dozen career Web sites and have never heard anything back from any of them. This is therefore either a futile process or I'm unemployable!

Finally, a jobs section allows employers to advertise positions available for immediate take up. There are only seven jobs currently listed -- none of them posted recently -- so this section also looks a bit superfluous. Users can, however, register to receive e-mails when new jobs are posted.

For Next Wave readers, the Milkround site is a good place to go for basic information on alternative careers. You'll also come away with a few contacts to send applications to. Although the information available is fairly basic, it's very easy to navigate through the site and find what you are looking for. It's well worth a visit.