Situation of Researchers

What Becomes of Sweden's Ph.D.s?
Ingela Björck
1 April 2005
The road to a Ph.D. degree may be hard and thorny, but when you finally get it, don't expect it to be a bed of roses. Not in Sweden anyway.

False Economics? University Expansion and Entrepreneurial Growth
Ingela Björck
7 May 2004
According to the yearly Global Enterpreneurship Monitor, just 4% of the adult Swedish population is involved in enterprise, either just starting a new business or having launched one in the last 42 months.

Sweden's Brain Gain
Ingela Björck
16 January 2004
Swedish worries about an academic brain drain may be due to a few highly publicised cases of top scientists leaving for better salaries and swankier lab conditions, mainly in the United States. But although there may be a brain drain when it comes to quality, in terms of quantity there is no such thing.

The Best Place for Mothers?
Ingela Björk
9 January 2004
The Scandinavian countries are often seen as paragons when it comes to gender equality and support for parenthood. But does the myth live up to the reality?

One in Five Swedes Unhappy With Research Training
Ingela Björck
31 October 2003
Swedish postgrads are a pretty contented lot. According to a recent survey, almost 80% of them would start their PhD studies all over again, even with the benefit of hindsight, and at the same university. But that still equates to "22% calling their PhD studies 'unsatisfactory' or 'very unsatisfactory'."

Swedish Clinical Research in Crisis
Ingela Björk
24 October 2003
If Swedish clinical research were a patient, its condition might be described as critical. The predicament is twofold: too little money and time available for clinicians who want to do research, and a younger generation of doctors that is reluctant to embark on research at all.

Guiding the Guides
Ingela Björck
27 June 2003
Being a graduate student can be tough, but supervising a graduate student is no easy task either. Supervisors are usually given no training, and they often have nobody to turn to if the student-supervisor relationship runs into professional or personal difficulties. Little surprise, then, that a 2-week course for supervisors at Umeå University in Sweden has become immensely popular.

Filling the Swedish Recruitment Gap
Ingela Björck
4 October 2002
Sweden's top-heavy universities face a recruitment crisis in the next decade, warns a recent report from the Swedish Research Council (Vetenskapsrådet, SRC).

Role Models

A Look at Health Care Biotech
Anne Forde
9 September 2005
Stephen James is a departmental director at a Swedish biotechnology firm called Biovitrum, in Stockholm, where he manages a research team of 40 people.

Saving the Materials of Music
Anne Forde
26 November 2004
Presenting your materials science research results to a group of Italian organ builders may seem like a bizarre assignment. But that is precisely what Swedish chemist and materials science researcher Annika Niklasson recently did, with a little interpreting help from some of her Italian collaborators.

Swede Smell of Success
Sassan Hafizi
9 July 2004
Although not traditionally a country UK postdocs choose to further their careers, Sweden is one country that would be a great shame to overlook.

Testing New Waters
Anu Reinart
9 July 2004
Anu Reinart decided to apply for a Marie Curie Fellowship that gave her the opportunity to work on a dream research area, environmental remote sensing, and to gain confidence and independence as a researcher in her own right.

A Vulcanus Year in Japan
Linda Marlind
5 September 2003
Linda Marlind of Sweden's Chalmers University of Technology recently completed a year's work experience, combined with language and cultural training, in Japan through the Vulcanus programme that is aimed at European science and engineering students.

Opportunities

Caught Up in the Grid
Anne Forde
24 September 2004
Seamless methods of sharing resources and cheap high-performance computer power are among the promises that grid technology has been offering for quite some time now.

The Medicon Valley Region: Academia and Industry Join Forces in Research and Training
David Jensen
2 May 2003
I have recently returned from a trip to Denmark and Southern Sweden. I went expecting to find two countries with completely different biotechnology development schemes. Instead I discovered a single, seamless region of bio-pharma growth.

Selling Science
Jim Kling
1 August 2003
After years of intense study to master genetics, or biochemistry, or physics, sales might seem like a pushover. But a leap into instrument sales is not to be made lightly.

Interdisciplinary to the Core
Ingela Björk
3 January 2003
"Interdisciplinarity" might be today's fashionable buzzword, but for one institution in Sweden, it is the reason for its very existence.

Stem Cell Cash Causes Delight ... And Controversy
Kristian Hallermalm
20 September 2002
Nine projects and two networks will share more than €4.8 million in the first round of funding from a new Swedish stem cell research programme.

Leading the Way: Stem Cell Research in Sweden
Kristian Hallermalm
9 August 2002
As stem cells have emerged as one of today?s really hot topics, Swedish research groups and Swedish scientists working abroad have made several contributions that have pushed the field forward, including the discovery of dividing neuronal stem cells in the adult human brain.

Outreach: Bringing ScienceCareers to You Live

Tools For Researchers - A Career Development Workshop
Presented by:
ScienceCareers.org and the Junior Faculty at the Karolinska Institute
Saturday 10th December 2005
Nobel Forum, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden

Insider tips on granting writing, publishing in high impact journals. Plus your careers options in academia, industry and beyond.

Tools for Researchers - A Career Development Workshop
Stockholm, 6 November 2004
Presented by the Junior Faculty at the Karolinska Institute
and Science's Next Wave

This workshop, was the first Swedish outreach event coordinated by the Junior Faculty at the Karolinska Institute and Science's Next Wave. The event, held at the Institute's Nobel Forum on Saturday 6th November 2004, attracted a full house. Attendees consisted of PhD students, postdoctoral researchers, senior researchers, and the remainder were undergraduates or medical doctors.