In the world of science careers, many things change fast. Booming industries go bust in just a few years. New career paths are born that didn't exist before. The tenure track declines, and postdoc appointments get longer and longer.

But many other things change slowly, if they change at all. Prospective employers may have become more selective—a luxury afforded them by an ever-increasing abundance of talent—but they are still looking for the same virtues in an applicant. Consequently, career advice published many years ago may be just as valuable today.

"How to Present Your Weaknesses During Interviews" was first published in November of 1998. It is by David Jensen, who has written our Tooling Up column since the earliest days of Science's Next Wave (as this site was called until the mid-2000s). Despite its age, this article is hardly obscure; it has rarely dropped off our top 20 list. Still, we thought we'd reintroduce it in the hope of spreading its timeless wisdom to a new generation of readers. Enjoy.

Jim Austin is the editor of Science Careers. @SciCareerEditor on Twitter

10.1126/science.caredit.a1400077